Indigenous Film Series April – November 2021

The New Westminster Public Library and the New Westminster Museum and Archives are proud bring you a four-part Indigenous Film series.

Our goal is to centre the voices and experience of Indigenous lives, as told through the richness of Indigenous writing and film. Through discussions related to each film, we embrace the opportunity to engage in meaningful dialogue, learning, and inclusive relationship-building with all members of our community. We invite you to view each of the selected films and then join us on the dates indicated below, as members of our local Indigenous community lead us in discussion.

All films are accessible online via the free-to-stream links provided below.

Beyond Human Power

This documentary explores the history of the potlatch ban in B.C. and the new generations of indigenous youth connecting to their culture by reclaiming their traditional dance.

ACCESS: Watch the documentary any time via CBC Gem: Beyond Human Power

ONLINE DISCUSSION: Tuesday April 27th, 6pm-7pm

Join us in conversation with Gordon Loverin and Pamela Jones as they lead us in discussing their documentary Beyond Human Power.

Gordon is from the Tlingit and Tahltan First Nations and deeply connected to his culture. He is a multi-media storyteller with a track record as a content creator for major Canadian networks including CityTV, CTV and NEDAA in the Yukon, and has produced, directed and edited 20+ productions for corporate and government clients.

Pamela is a graduate of UBC Theatre and BCIT Broadcast. Along with being an accomplished actress and voice talent, Pamela has written and produced several news and entertainment radio shows before moving on to write and voice for Knowledge Network Public Television for over a decade.

Register by phone at 604-527-4666 or by email at askus@nwpl.ca

Indian Horse

Adapted from the novel by author Richard Wagamese, this film tells the story of Saul Indian Horse, a young Ojibway boy as he experiences the struggles of life in residential school and beyond.

ACCESS: You can watch the film any time via CBC Gem: Indian Horse

ONLINE DISCUSSION: Tuesday June 15th, 6pm-7pm

Join us in conversation with Phyllis Webstad (nee Jack) as we discuss the feature film Indian Horse. Adapted from the novel by author Richard Wagamese, this film tells the story of Saul Indian Horse, a young Ojibway boy as he experiences the struggles of life in residential school and beyond.

Phyllis is Northern Secwepemc (Shuswap) form the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (Canoe Creek/Dog Creek).  She comes from mixed Secwepemc and European ancestry.  She was born in Dog Creek and lives in Williams Lake, BC, Canada.  Today, Phyllis is married, has one son, a step-son and five grandchildren.

She earned diplomas in Business Administration from the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology; and in Accounting from Thompson Rivers University (TRU). Phyllis received the 2017 TRU Distinguished Alumni:  Community Impact Award for her unprecedented impact on local, provincial, national and international communities through the sharing of her orange shirt story.

She is the Executive Director of the Orange Shirt Society, and tours the country telling her story and raising awareness about the impacts of the residential school system.  She has now published two books, “The Orange Shirt Story” and “Phyllis’s Orange Shirt” for younger children.  These books share her story in her own words.  They tell the story of young Phyllis having her orange shirt taken away on her first day of Residential School and never to see it again.  A simple orange shirt has become a conversation starter for all aspects of Residential School across Canada and beyond.

Register by phone at 604-527-4666 or by email at askus@nwpl.ca

Nisga’a Dancing in Both Worlds

Film makers John Bassett and Rosalind Farber made numerous trips to Nisga’a territory beginning in 2003 to document Nisga’a history, their struggle and life since the Nisga’a treaty was signed in May 2000. The result is the documentary Nisga’a Dancing in Both Worlds.

ACCESS: You can watch the film any time on YouTube: Nisga’a Dancing in Both Worlds

ONLINE DISCUSSION: Tuesday September 21st 6PM – 7PM

Join us in conversation with Dr. Bruce McIvor, a lawyer and historian working with the First Peoples Law Corporation, a law firm dedicated to defending and advancing Aboriginal title, Aboriginal rights and Treaty rights. His work includes both litigation and negotiation on behalf of Indigenous Peoples.  Bruce is a proud Métis from the Red River in Manitoba and is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading practitioner of Aboriginal law in Canada.

Register by phone at 604-527-4666 or by email at askus@nwpl.ca

Indigenous Law, Lands, and Waters

Through a series of three short films –  Indigenous Law: An Introduction, H̓aíkilaxsi c̓isḷá w̓áw̓áx̌tusa gáyáqḷa qṇts dṃxsax̌v: Respecting and Taking Care of our Ocean Relatives, and Indigenous Plant Diva – filmmaker Kamala Todd introduces the key role of Indigenous laws and knowledge in restoring good relations with the lands and waters, and honouring Indigenous sovereignty.

ACCESS: You can watch these short films anytime via the following links:

Indigenous Law: An Introduction

H̓aíkilaxsi c̓isḷá w̓áw̓áx̌tusa gáyáqḷa qṇts dṃxsax̌v: Respecting and Taking Care of our Ocean Relatives

Indigenous Plant Diva

ONLINE DISCUSSION: Tuesday November 23rd 6pm –  7pm

Join us in conversation with filmmaker Kamala Todd. Kamala is a Metis-Cree mother, community planner, writer, and filmmaker born and raised in the beautiful lands of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Skwxwú7mesh-speaking people (aka Vancouver). She is adjunct professor at SFU Urban Studies and UBC SCARP. She was the City of Vancouver’s first Indigenous Arts and Culture Planner and her film credits include Cedar and Bamboo, RELAW: Living Indigenous Laws, and Indigenous Plant Diva. She advises local governments and other organizations on decolonizing with a focus on planning, heritage, public art, education, and other areas of systemic colonialism.

Register by phone at 604-527-4666 or by email at askus@nwpl.ca

Questions? Please call 604-526-4666 or email askus@nwpl.ca.

The Library and Museum recognizes and commits to the important work to be done in support of Reconciliation with our Indigenous communities.  We do this in alignment with the City of New Westminster’s Statement on Reconciliation, Inclusion and Engagement.